Canned Seafood – Give it a try!!

Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 07:00 AM

Seafood has a wealth of benefits including excellent sources of Vitamin D, heart healthy omega 3’s and minerals.  It is low in saturated fat and is a complete protein.  Most Americans don’t eat nearly as much as they should.  The USDA recommends eating at least 2 servings (approximately 8oz) a week. Eating seafood regularly can reduce the chances of getting depression, dementia, stroke and/or hypertension.

Pregnant women should aim for approximately 8-12oz of low mercury servings a week to benefit the brain and eye development in their growing fetus.  Some examples low in mercury include but are not limited to salmon, tilapia and haddock.  Seafood much higher in mercury include tuna, mackerel and swordfish. Unless you’re pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant, mercury poisoning is nothing really to worry about.   For a complete list of the amount of mercury in your favorite seafood, see http://www.nrdc.org/health/effects/mercury/guide.asp for more information.

Now you’re probably wondering “I would love to eat seafood, but I can’t afford it!”  Luckily canned varieties are typically less expensive than fresh.  But I’m not saying that all canned seafood is considered equal.  You should aim for the ones free of sodium, sugar and oils.  If that isn’t possible, you can reduce the amounts of these added ingredients by rinsing the canned seafood and patting it dry after opening.

So let’s talk a little bit about the canning method.  Canning is a procedure where the fish is sealed in a can (who would have thought???) and is heated beyond boiling point.  This sterilization process prohibits microorganisms from gaining access to the can.  This process increases the shelf life of the product and prevents it from going bad.  You can tell if your fish has gone bad if it produces a foul smell.

 

Check out this simple recipe for a salmon cake here: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/24509/grandmas-famous-salmon-cakes/?internalSource=recipe%20hub&referringId=1863&referringContentType=recipe%20hub

Posted by: Stephanie Palmer No comments yet

Posted in: Heart Health Month 2016

Heart Health Month

Monday, February 1, 2016 at 07:00 AM

Welcome to Heart Health Month on A Better Bag of Groceries! In the month of February we plan to focus on a different kind of canned/packaged food that is often associated with being unhealthy. We intend to explain why they are beneficial and how to get the most nutrition out the food themselves. In most cases the source of the unhealthiness is often in the WAY the food is canned or packaged in order to preserve it, NOT the food itself. Many of the foods we intend to focus on are excellent sources of lean protein, fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.  On Feb 3rd we will talk about canned seafood, canned/packaged nuts on Feb 10th, canned fruit on Feb 17th, and canned tomatoes and vegetables on Feb 24th. We hope you enjoy this series and learn how to get the most nutritious bang for your buck!

Posted by: Stephanie Palmer 1 comment

Posted in: Heart Health Month 2016

Yerba-maté: Check it out!

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 08:00 AM

This drink has ancient roots, going back to the Guarani natives of Paraguay and Northern Argentina. This tea is derived from an evergreen plant of the holly family. This tea tends to be bitter, much like green tea. A great majority of Uruguay and Argentina consume this drink, but its popularity is reaching the US and Europe because of its health benefits. It provides a boost of energy while also supplying a multitude of nutrients. Maté is great for strengthening your immune, nervous, digestive, ad cardiovascular system. Because it’s caffeinated, it’s a great substitute for coffee in the morning. The traditional way to prepare yerba mate is quite interesting, particularly because of the equipment involved. If you’re walking around Uruguay or Argentina, you just might see people carrying around the small gourd, or maté, to make this tea in, as well as the metal straw (bombilla) they use to prepare this tea. Ma-Tea has some very detailed directions and videos that can guide you through the process but very simply, you can fill your mate cup about two-thirds of the way up with mate leaves. Much like you would bloom coffee grounds, “awaken” your mate leaves by pouring warm water over them and allow them to soak for 30 seconds. Proceed by adding the mate straw into the wet tea, and then pour the rest of the hot water in. Feel free to sweeten with a touch of honey or sugar to taste. Enjoy!!

Posted by: Amanda Barillas No comments yet

Posted in: Hot Tea Month 2016

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Rooibos: Tea or Not A Tea?

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 07:00 AM

Rooibos (pronounced ROY-bos) is a caffeine-free beverage made typically from the South African Red Bush, which raises the question as to whether or not rooibos is a tea. Red Rooibos, as opposed to its green counterpart, is sweet and nutty in taste. This tea has surged in popularity in the Western hemisphere not just for its unique flavor but also for its multitude of health benefits. Rooibos is anti-cancerous and protects against free radicals. It also promotes healthy circulation and better sleep. And if you’re running low on mineral intake, rooibos is chock-full of essential minerals including calcium, manganese, and magnesium. The best way to enjoy this tea is to steep 1 tablespoon of rooibos per cup of water for 3-5 minutes, or until you get a deep pink color. The final step: ENJOY!

Check out the third “How-To” video on how to make delicious rooibos tea! https://youtu.be/x6kmwGoC6-0

Recipe: http://food52.com/recipes/19673-vanilla-rooibos-tea-cookies

Posted by: Amanda Barillas No comments yet

Posted in: Hot Tea Month 2016

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Chamomile Tea: Can I have some more chamomile?!

Wednesday, January 20, 2016 at 07:00 AM

You’ll be asking that same question once you try it and learn about how good it is for you. This tea is made from the chamomile flower, which is similar to dandelions. Chamomile tends to have fruity, floral, apple-y notes that make it naturally sweet with a touch of tart. This tea originated in Egypt, where it was used as a cold remedy. Other ancient peoples, including the Romans, utilized chamomile for its medicinal properties.  It is caffeine-free and is actually an excellent before-bed beverage. It is also great for reducing menstrual cramping, preventing cancer, reducing anxiety, treating hemorrhoids, calming aching bellies, and managing diabetes. The best way to enjoy chamomile tea is to place the tea bag or loose leaves apparatus (if using an infuser) in your favorite mug and add water that was just brought to the boil (about 8 oz per tea bag or heaping teaspoon of loose-leaves). Let steep for 5-10 minutes, which will allow the leaves to release all of their flavor and benefits. You can curl up with this warm cup of tea, a great book, and some sweet biscuits if you’re feeling like a before-bed snack. Or, as you can see with this recipe, feel free to infuse this sweet tea into any of your desserts!

Recipe: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/strawberries-with-chamomile-cream

Posted by: Amanda Barillas No comments yet

Posted in: Hot Tea Month 2016

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